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2015-07-16 10.23.53My son is in eleventh grade.

OH MY!

Did I really just say that?  Could that adorable little boy who used to run around the block to watch the garbage truck every Thursday really be a junior in high school? Oh, where has the time gone?

Well at least planning a junior year in high school was easier the second time around.  I've already been through it once with my daughter who is a junior in college this year.  (Don't get me started on those tears again!) I learned from a few more years experience, more research, and yes, from the mistakes I made the first time.

So what exactly are we doing this year in our homeschool for his junior year? Thanks for asking!

In Pennsylvania, the following credits are mandatory for graduation:

  • English -  4 credits
  • Math - 3 credits
  • Science - 3 credits
  • Social Studies -3 credits
  • Arts & Humanities- 2 credits


For English, this year, I decided to focus completely on Literature and a Research Paper.  My son is on the local school district's football team and, as I learned last year, there's a lot of time in his schedule devoted to football so I determined to wait on the research paper until the Spring semester.  He'll be taking an online course - probably here. For the literature aspect, I decided to give him some more of his own leadership this year - which is not easy for me - but I'm thinking it may be beneficial.  Basically, he needs to read about  15-20 books (depending on length; some longer works may count as two books).  I have only made three specific titles mandatory this year:  All Quiet on the Western Front, All Creatures Great and Small and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. Yep- that's it. He has to decide the rest for himself - with some guidance of course!  All the books that he chooses must be sound quality literature and NOT considered TWADDLE (he may pick ONE book that I would consider twaddle just for fun if he chooses but one is the limit!).  A minimum of 2 books that he chooses MUST be considered 'classics' by at least one reliable source as deemed by myself. He will be giving both oral and written narrations of all the books he reads (including a few that we will use as read alouds).

For Consumer Math & Finance, we are using a combination of the Abeka Consumer Math curriculum and Dave Ramsey's homeschool curriculum titled Foundations in Personal Finance as well as taking part in the monthly budget meetings held by my husband and myself.

Science this year will be an Anatomy & Physiology class taken with the local homeschool group. I wasn't thrilled about taking part of this since it would take up our Tuesday afternoons and affects my ability to get my youngest son to swimming lessons but as my older son thinks a science major may be in his future, I felt it important enough to find a class with a teacher that knows more about this subject than me!

One credit will also be given for Home Economics.  I have devised the course myself and have a set number of mandatory hours (120+ total) in a variety of subcategories including cooking, home maintenance, automotive, nutrition, sewing and laundry.  Most of the requirements is hands on participation but some will involve reading articles and other reference materials.  I love the fact that we have recently found a new handyman that would be a great resource to use to teach my son a few things that my husband and are not capable of teaching. I just hope that eventually my son will be here when the handyman is! So far the football season has interfered with that quite a bit!

He will also have two half credit courses this year.  One such course is Economics.  He will be using the well known source Whatever Happened to Penny Candy as well as the Bluestocking Guide Economics and The Money Mystery to complete the course.  All of these books are pictured above with Amazon links!

The other half credit course that I created for my son is Introduction to Christianity.  He will be using the book Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy by Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick as well as The Orthodox Way by Bishop Kallistos Ware (Bishop Wares book has actually been used in college Introduction to Christianity classes).  We will be using a Charlotte Mason approach with this class in that he will be giving both oral and written narrations for these book selections in addition to related articles that we find through the year.

Finally, my son will be taking a Study Skills course which I have assigned a full credit as he is using several sources to complete the course and give him a firm foundation in skills essential to success in his college career.  For this course, I have selected College Study: The essential ingredients by Sally A. Lipsky, a professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania as well as the other text used by the same university, How to Study in College by Pauk and Owens.  He will also be watching a very old video course that my husband thrived on, Where There's a Will, There's an A.

So there it is!  The plan for the eleventh grade year.  I think it will work well.  But only time will tell!  I’ll keep you posted in other posts this year as well as my monthly updates!

 

 

Book Title:  From Little Acorns: A First Look at the Life Cycle of a Tree(First Look: Science)

Author:  Sam Godwin

Genre: Picture Book,  Science

Illustrator: Simone Abel

Publisher: Picture Window Books

  • ISBN-10: 140480658X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1404806580

Pages: 32

Age: 4 and up

Why Did I Choose It?  It is fall and we (my son and I) found it in the seasonal book display at our library.  Eager to read and discover more about nature to start on our journey with the Charlotte Mason methodology, I found it to be a great accompaniment to our nature walks!

A Bit From The Back Cover:  Take a walk through a leafy forest and join some curious woodland creatures as they find out how a tiny acorn becomes a giant oak tree.

My Review:  This was a delightful read!  It is a wonderful Living Book for this age group!  From Little Acorns was a wonderful introduction for my son to understand more about the hundreds of acorns spread about our yard as well as motivate him to look for seedlings and saplings.  He enjoyed the illustrations and hearing what the squirrels in the story had to say to one another.  I enjoyed that he was able to absorb so much factual information within a nicely illustrated story.  This was the perfect book to read at the beginning of fall when the leaves and acorns began to fall.

Other Books By This Author: A Seed in Need: A First Look at the Plant Cycle,  The Trouble With Tadpoles: A First Look at the Life Cycle of a Frog,  Which Switch is Which?: A First Look at Electricity,  and several others!  Find his page on Amazon.

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          In response to a recent question and one that I actually get quite often, I've decided to post today about the subjects required to be taught according to the Pennsylvania Homeschool Law.

           Each year, the home education program must provide at least 180 days of instruction(this is 900 hours at the elementary hours if the parent chooses to keep track of  hours rather than days or 990 hours at the secondary level). At the elementary level, the student must have English (reading/literature, spelling and writing), math, science, geography, history of the United States and Pennsylvania, civics, safety education (including fire prevention), health, physical education, music and art. At the secondary level, the student must have English (grammar, composition, literature and speech), science, geography, social studies(American history, Pennsylvania history, world history, civics), mathematics (including algebra and geometry), art, music, physical education, health and safety education(again to include fire safety).

          That's a long list of subjects.  But know that not all of these subjects need to be taught every year.  Each subject only needs to be covered at some point during the elementary or secondary level as specified.  The majority of homeschoolers cover English, history (American, world, ancient, etc., usually one per year), science and math as well as art and/or music, and some form of physical education and fire education during the course of a year.  Health is usually thrown in with science at some point.

       However,  it doesn't have to be done this way.  The law really allows for flexibility.  For example, if the idea of teaching both science and history in one year seems daunting, it's okay to teach one at a time every other year so as to cover more material and have the time to do more intensive projects.  Geography can be taught as one individual subject or can be included in with history each year. Pennsylvania history, contrary to popular misconception, does not have to be covered every year (nor do the other subjects other than fire safety).  It can be added in small amounts yearly or as a single subject during half or all of a single year.

          Art and music also do not need to be taught each year. A lot of homeschoolers do teach them, in some manner, each year.  Art can be included easily by way of drawing illustrations or making art projects for the other subjects. Some homeschoolers take art lessons and some study famous artists from the history time periods they are covering that year.  Music is often covered in the way of instrument lessons or voice lessons.  Some cover this by studying composers of the history period they are currently studying.  Again, they do not have to be covered each year so some homeschoolers may pick just one year to do a more intensive study of one of these subjects.

          Physical education also does not need to be covered each year...but I urge you to do so for the health and well-being of your child.  It does not have to be any type of specific sport, though many opt to participate in homeschool co-op sports or participate in a sport offered by the local district as it is in the law that homeschool students are allowed to take part in these extracurricular activities/sports.  A daily walk or bike ride could also cover this requirement and gets your child out in the outdoors and good exposure to the sun offering its' natural vitamin D supply!  A list of such activities in the portfolio or a few photographs of your child participating in one or all of these is enough to demonstrate that this requirement is being filled.

          Fire education does need to be represented in your portfolio each and every year.  It can be covered in a field trip to the fire station with your local homeschool co-op or you may draw out a fire escape plan with your child and discuss a meeting place outside your home in the even of a fire.[ ***PLEASE have a meeting place established!!  If you don't have one yet, do it NOW.  You can never predict when there will be a fire.]   There are lots of online resources as well.

           In regards to high school classes, some Pennsylvania homeschoolers seem to think that speeches must be done each year due to regulations set by the diploma agencies.  Please note that getting a diploma through an agency is NOT required and not at all necessary.  Parent-issued diplomas are equally legal and this is what the majority of homeschoolers across America use.  So while speech is listed as a requirement for the high school level, it is not a yearly requirement.  Research papers are not a yearly requirement by the state either.

          This is a summary of this part of the law.  I'm sure I have not answered every question you may have regarding the teaching of these subjects.  Feel free to comment below with any additional questions you have and I'll do my best to provide an answer.  I also always recommend to other homeschoolers that they become a member of HSLDA (Homeschool Legal Defense Association).  HSLDA provides not only legal counsel but a wealth of information regarding the law, curriculum and so much more on their website.  They have answered a considerable number of questions for me over the years and I can always rely on the website for an abundance of resources.

I'm sure my readers would also love to read in comments below what other creative ways you've used to apply these subjects!

Have a blessed day!