About orthodoxmom3

I am an Orthodox Christian wife and a mother of three that is loving the life God has given me. I wear many, many hats in this life including Christian, wife, mother, reader, writer, teacher, homeschool advocate, cook and so many more. I love to write about them all! See my About Page for more and be sure to follow An Orthodox Homeschool if you want just the homeschool posts or get ALL the posts on The Many Hats of an Orthodox Mom!

Today is the Feast Day of the Annunciation  -  the announcement made by the Angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would have a child.

The Gospel Reading is Luke 1:25-38.

"And having come, the angel said to her, 'Rejoice, highly favored one, the Lord is with you; blessed are you among women.'

Mary was blessed.  She was highly favored, Full of Grace!

She is, in fact, the most blessed woman who has ever lived because of her absolute and complete  willingness to receive God's grace .  As spoken by her son, the Theotokos, Mary, was blessed to "hear the word of God and keep it" (see Luke 11:28).  She was the first to say yes to Jesus!  Her response was of highest obedience to God.  She sets an example for us all.

Where the first woman, Eve, was disobedient to God, Mary is obedient.

This is an obedience to God we can all learn from.  And teach to others.  Especially our children.

Will I teach my 6 year old about Mary's virginity?  No, not this year.  Will we have lots of lessons to  teach him about all the details of Mary's life and about the Betrothal between her and Joseph and teach him how Jesus was her only son and that Joseph's other children came from a previous marriage?  All of this in due time, but for a 6 year old?  My focus is on the most important aspect.  Mary said Yes!  She said Yes to God and that is what we all must do.  She is the greatest woman who ever lived because she accepted God's will with willingness.

Accepting God's will with willingness.

Isn't accepting God's will  what we all struggle with?

Isn't obedience what we all struggle with?

Isn't obedience what our children struggle with?

This feast day is a wonderful opportunity to teach our children the wonderful ways of obedience-  how obedience to God can change the world.

For more about why I think Mary is the Greatest Woman Who Ever lived, see my post from November, 2013.

Have mercy on me, O God, according to Thy steadfast love...

 

We read over it daily.

We talk about the meaning of the words, the meaning of the prayer.

For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me.

 

I make him aware of his transgressions and, sure enough, he makes me aware of my own.  Not so much in our lessons, but in day to day life.  Those are the most important lessons of all.

Our children are tools to our salvation.  No one can point out to me my sinful ways or humble me quite as quickly as this little being.

Behold, Thou desirest truth in the inward being; therefore teach me wisdom in my secret heart.

 

God gave us these children.  They teach us wisdom.  Oh but to have the open eyes of a child!  To see the glories they see-  and to see the truths that come so easily to them!

 

Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me.

A constant prayer on my lips, in my heart...

 

Cast me not away from Thy presence, and take not Thy holy Sprit from me.

 

I need His ever presence.  I need the guidance of the spirit.  I must look to Him to restore my joy.  I must guide this young child to always seek His presence.

O Lord, open Thou my lips, and my mouth shall show forth Thy praise

 

Oh and Lord close them when they need to be closed!

 

The sacrifice acceptable to God is a broken spirit

Stay close to me Lord- through this Lenten season and all the seasons to come.  Help me to break this prideful spirit...help me to sacrifice and show Thy steadfast love and Thy abundant mercy to all as you have given freely to me.

Help me to teach these young ones the same.

Thank you to Basil Fritts of Flickr for the photo- slight adjustments were made.

 

 

 

 

Ladder of Divine Ascent

I stated in a previous post that I would be reading Thirty Steps to Heaven for Lent this year.  I've always enjoyed the vision of the Ladder as it offers us as Orthodox a visual of steps to take on our journey in becoming closer to God.  For my readers who are not Orthodox, Saint John Climacus, also known as Saint John of Sinai and St. John of the Ladder, wrote a document for the monastic at Sinai in which has been known as wonderful guidance to not only monastics, but to the layman as well. Vassilios Papavassiliou has written a guide for us average person to go along with the Ladder of Divine Ascent-  a little more easily understood and relative to those of us not taking monastic vows so to speak.  In other words, ordinary folk living within the world that may have some difficulty understanding the words of Saint John or how to apply it to our daily lives as spouses,  mothers, homemakers, homeschoolers and parishioners can now more easily learn and accept the challenges offered by the words of St. John.

The author does well to remind us that the climb is not necessarily in order rung by rung.  So those of us that have not obtained the mastery of renunciation, the first step, do not have to feel we are stuck forever on the first rung.  In reading the book, I must admit I'm probably stuck on them all thus far- and I'm only halfway through. The author goes on to say that very few people will be able to climb all 30 steps of the ladder.  In fact, if you think you have, he says, you probably need to go back to the beginning.

I could probably write an entire blog on just this book alone.  I have a feeling it will be a starting point for many future posts. It will definitely be on my shelf of books to reread.  This one may become well worn in time.

In the meantime, if you haven't read it yet, I urge you to do so-  Orthodox or not.  It is packed of great wisdom on how to live this life always thinking of our relationship with God and keeping in mind that all we do or don't do affects that relationship.

God wants us to have a child's heart.  Thus St. John tells novices of the monastic life to look to infants as their example.  We can take this to apply equally to adult converts or nominal Christians who have only now decided to make a beginning of spiritual life.  God ants us, though grown up with adult minds, having knowledge, wisdom, and understanding , to be like children:  "Unless you are converted and become as little children, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 18:3).

 

An Apple a Day MIGHT keep the doctor away, among other vegetables and healthy meats and proteins, but too many will keep the doctor coming...  and we discussed this in our very quick lesson using google finds.

My son is not thrilled that he had to give up his habit of a small dish of organic ice-cream or a small  gluten-free ice-cream cone as his bedtime snack for Lent.  We give up dairy and all processed foods during our Whole30 which we do during Lent for fasting and health reasons.

However, he does like his apples.  Add a little peanut butter/almond butter (he claims he doesn't like almond butter but I mixed it half and half for two weeks without his knowledge...we are moving on to about 1/3 pb and 2/3 almond butter this week) and he's a happy kid.

So the other night he asked what  was good about apples. " Let's make that a project for tomorrow", I said.  "Write a note to remind us and we'll spend some time looking that up."  So with apple in hand we did just that yesterday.

We found some pretty cool videos and sites.

Fun Nutrition For Kids!  Fresh Apple vs. Fast Food Apple Pie

Apples: History & Nutrition

Fresh For Kids: Apple

Apples 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits   -  This one we breezed through-  and I made note of the link because I figured this will be a good base of vocabulary to start with as I begin teaching him REAL nutrition- not necessarily what you find in the public school health books (see below).  He knows about vitamins & minerals, sort of , so that's what we are starting with (apples are a good source of vitamin c and potassium).

 

Here's his summary of the most important things we learned.

-Apples have vitamin c - even more than an orange!

-There's a lot of good stuff in the skin so we should eat that.

-It's better to eat the apple than the pie.

-There's sugar in apples so don't eat too many.

I don't think that's too bad for a quick fun lesson 😉

 

 

And today, he forgot all about apples and went on to paint and ladybugs 🙂     Funny kid.

 

*****Just a side note:  I'm a little cautious about the sources I use.  So doing a cold google search was a little frustrating.  There's lots of stuff out there about the food pyramid and I do NOT encourage the use of the food pyramid at all.  I want him to know about the nutrients of foods, but also want him to learn that yes, fats are good, sugar - even in apples- isn't.  So we have to talk through what we learn.  We need to learn about the nutrients , but also about the things that counter the nutrients and how to balance it all out.  This was a good start.  Apples are good-  too many aren't. And we encourage the almond butter with it to add some protein and healthy fat to the treat 🙂

2

A few of you have asked me over the year---  what are you working on?

Well, uh.... nothing really.

This is it.

The blog has come back to life,  And that's where my satisfaction must lie for now.  And I'm okay with that....kind of.

Life just got to hectic for awhile.  I do too much.  I know.  And everything I do I attempt with this perfectionist gung-ho enthusiasm worrying that it's not good enough and then I keep adding more things to the list---  just take what I blog about here ---  the books, the homeschooling, the food, the natural products, my time to God and my faith, my family, my friends.....    all this and more and not in any particular order.  But it's a lot.  And I got caught up in it all and frazzled by not being able to do it all perfectly and not being able to please everyone (including myself) to the point that I can barely catch a breath.  Gee--- is it any wonder I have adrenal fatigue?

So I threw in the towel awhile back on the manuscript writing and the blog.  I thought somehow that would make everything else okay.  Did it?  No, not really.  Because, as I'm learning,  in my facing that my body is suffering from the stress and other health issues I had over the years, that the thing I need to learn most is just to be at peace with myself and the fact that I am not perfect and I will never be....probably even less so the more I drive myself.

So I've lowered some standards and changing my perception over the course of this year (our style of homeschooling has probably been the most pleasant and biggest change) and I'm slowly adding some things back in that bring me peace and uplift my spirit- namely reading, having fun with Lemongrass Spa and yes, my writing.  But for now the writing needs to stay with the blog.

With the blog, it allows me to write about all the things that bring me joy and the things I'm learning about.  I'll probably be writing more about my learning and experiences with adrenal fatigue and won't have a lot of time for manuscripts just yet.  I do think I might start keeping a notebook again though.  To write down ideas as they come to me.  I just need to NOT scratch out actual stories, because, for me, that just leads to frustration that I don't have time to keep at it.

But to all my writer friends.  I haven't forgotten you.  I'd love to hear from you and know what you are up to.  And someday-  I'll be back in the children's writing scene!

 

Another week has been completed of our Whole30 during this Lenten Season.  I'm so grateful that we are using Lent as a huge motivator for this one as well as my recent discovery of adrenal fatigue to further keep me motivated, as those chocolate and sugar cravings were tough this week!

I stuck with it though, with a lot of prayer and focusing on my bible  and other spiritual readings.

To know that I really need to extend this whole30 for myself, at least for the most part, seems daunting at this point, but I am grateful to know what the reasons are for my symptoms and to know that this Paleo lifestyle has helped this issue from growing worse and will keep me on track for recovery sooner!  So while it seems daunting at times, I know also it's the standard way of today's living - high amounts of sugar and processed foods, constantly being on the go, not learning how to say no or take care of myself - is a good part of what's gotten me here, and those are the things that I have control over and the Whole30 is a big part in getting me back on track.  It won't teach me to say no or take care of myself in a LOT of ways, but it does teach me to be more aware of what foods have an effect on my body.

This past week was another set of delicious meals!

Again breakfasts were mostly scrambled eggs with either hash browns, sautéed veggies or a small bit of fruit such as blueberries and strawberries. For myself, I preferred heating up a mix of leftovers in the morning. Here is one of y mixtures! It’s a combination of brussels sprouts (my personal favorite) and the roast from last week and a side of fruit.

Lunches were leftovers, salad, or what we call a lunch plate. It’s simply a few slices of organic lunchmeat (ham, turkey, or roast beef), raw veggies, cashews or another nut, and a little fruit and occasionally a Lara Bar. Lunch plates are nice for when we are in a hurry. It tends to be my 6 year old’s favorite. He’s going through a somewhat picky stage right now though and will even complain about the lunchmeat on occasion as well as the raw veggies. It’s a phase.

This was our dinner menu for the week:

Monday: Paleo Sloppy Joes over Sweet Potatoes/Baked Potatoes, Salad

Tuesday: Beef and Gravy over Cauliflower Rice, Salad

Wednesday: Hamburgers on a bed of bib lettuce, tomatoes, and fried mushrooms and onions, fries (not technically a whole30 food but we use organic fries and bake them rather than fry)

Thursday: Spaghetti Squash with tomato sauce and meatballs, Salad

Friday: Tuna Salad over lettuce greens with tomato, cucumber and dried cherries, Baked Whole30 Week 2 Tuna SaladPotatoes/Sweet Potatoes ( my husband likes the sweets, the kids prefer the whites. I like both!)

Saturday: Leftovers (the guys were away part of this week so there were more leftovers in the fridge than usual, so Saturday became a planned leftover day as well as our usual Sunday)

Sunday:   Leftovers (Sunday is often a leftover day so nothing new here!)

So next week's menu is made and the grocery list is in progress for my Monday shopping trip. Once again I've used a recipe or two from  Well Fed Weeknights, my current favorite paleo book.  The recipes are mostly all Whole30 approved or easily adaptable.

I'll be sticking the Whole30 it despite the desire for chocolate that burns inside of me as I write this.  My health is important and needs to come first.  I'm learning more each day about the adrenals and adrenal fatigue and know that I need to change some habits and make new ones.  The Whole30 is the beginning to my adrenal health and a wonderful way to stay on my Lenten journey!  If you haven't ever done a Whole30, I encourage you to try it out!  Your body will thank you!

Have you done a Whole30?  What was the hardest part for you?

 

2

So we skipped the homeschool Schole’ group today.  The little man hasn't been feeling well over the last two days and still hadn't eaten much as of bedtime last night.  So I made the decision to let him sleep in and give him an extra day of rest.  It did me good too as I decided since I had some open space, to NOT set my alarm and let me sleep in too.  So even with the hour I was awake during the night ( either a symptom of or another cause of the adrenal fatigue), I still managed to get some extra sleep!

Still we had some extra time today and I had just bought the ingredients to make laundry detergent though I had no idea when I was going to get some time to do it (I had no idea how quick it would be!).  So as he seemed a bit perkier, I thought, why not?

I got the recipe from a friend a few days ago and had bought the ingredients yesterday:

4 lbs baking soda                                               

4 lbs washing soda

1 lb kosher salt (not sure why it called for kosher but why not?)

3 bars fells naptha soap  (or 1 bar zote)    I got the fels naptha because that's what Wegman's had, though she told me Walmart has the Zote already shredded.

 

We just poured all the baking soda, washing soda and salt together in a big basin.

Then came the 'fun' part for my son.  Grating the fels naptha.  It really wasn't bad.  He used the big bars until they were about half way then I did the rest-  being cautious of little fingers with the grater but really he did fine and I need to learn not to worry so much.

As we grated, I poured the shredded soap in with the soda mixture and stirred.  He enjoyed taking some turns to stir too.

After all was said and done, we poured the mix into some empty plastic containers I've had lying around for quite some time unused.  And Viola!  The first load is in the washer!

And other than  playing a game and some reading time tonight, that's our school for today and it was great!

By the way, all the ingredients came to about $12.50, which is less than a bottle of the store brand natural detergent I've been using.  And we only need to use 1 Tablespoon of detergent per load so this will definitely last by far longer than what I use!  YAY!

 

 

Well, we have gotten through the first week of our Whole30 during this Lenten season.  It hasn't been terribly bad since I am motivated by the Lenten Season in addition to really wanting to alleviate my adrenal fatigue.

My cravings for sugar and chocolate are ever present, but I am focusing on selecting healthy snacks as my alternative.  Technically, you are not supposed to snack during a Whole30, but those with adrenal fatigue SHOULD snack, so I am focusing on snacking on healthy options rather than my usual ( you know , chocolate or sugared processed something) and not doing the no snacking option.  I'm also being quite diligent in getting my 5 glasses of water in daily and this seems to be alleviating me from needing as many snacks as usual as my body feels more 'filled' with the water intake.

Most of our breakfasts this week have been eggs.  Scrambled eggs as that's the easiest to get my 6 year old to eat.  But each day I try to serve something with them that varies so that it doesn't seem to be the same meal each day. I do this, though my son and I are really learning just how spoiled we are as we near the end of The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder, our most recent bedtime story selection.  Laura and her family had only white potatoes and wheat to make bread for the longest time, and then only seed wheat which they had to hand grind in their coffee mill for a couple of months!  Yeah, somehow I feel less inclined to worry about whether our meals feel so varied.

Lunches have been primarily leftovers with some greens or a few slices of organic luncheon meats with some raw veggies and a clementine and a Lara Bar or a handful of nuts.

Dinners have the most variation and I do believe that variation is important in regards to nutrition.  It does our bodies well to have a variety of vegetables and such to be sure we are getting an assortment of vitamins and minerals.  I want to share my dinner mealtime with you here:

Monday:  Paleo Chocolate Chili over mashed potatoes made with ghee, coconut milk and garlic   &Salad

Tuesday: Crockpot Potatoes (baked potatoes & Sweet Potatoes in the crockpot), Sausage & Peppers, Salad

Wednesday:  Sweet Potato Soup with Bacon,  Salad

Thursday:  Turkey Burgers on a bed of lettuce (no bun of course) , Brussels Sprouts, Baked Sweet Potatoes

Friday:  Clam Chowder  & Salad with greens, blueberries, green bell pepper, scallions and cucumber

Saturday:  Roast,  Asparagus and Roasted Carrots

Sunday:  Leftovers-

One of my biggest dilemmas over the years is figuring out what sides to make with my meals to make sure the meal stays easy and, yes, I'll admit it, to add variety (both nutrition and pleasure reasons).  Maybe I'm the only one that stresses over this.  But I like to have something besides the easy frozen broccoli steamed in the pan...  so here's a few of our favorite sides from the week.  I hope you try them and enjoy them!

Print

Easy Roasted Asparagus

Ingredients:

2 bunches asparagus

ghee or grassfed butter

lemon-pepper seasoning


For this recipe, simply break off the ends of the asparagus.  Fresh asparagus should easily snap about an inch or so from the bottom.  Spread asparagus out on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.  Simply dot the amount of ghee/butter that you wish to use.  I use approximately 3 Tablespoons.  Sprinkle with lemon-pepper seasoning to taste.  Bake in oven at 350 for 12-15 minutes until asparagus are crisp-tender.  You don't want to overcook asparagus-  that's when it gets stringy.  Enjoy this simple side dish!

Cook Time 12 minutes
Servings 4
Print

Roasted Carrots

Ingredients:

4-5 large carrots

Coconut OIl

Cinnamon or Cumin


Simply remove ends from carrots and peel.  Cut carrots into 3-4 inch pieces and slice the pieces down the middle into 2-4 sticks.  Spread sticks on cookie sheet lined with parchment paper and dot with coconut oil.  For this many I use about 2 Tablespoons but this can vary according to your taste.  Sprinkle with cinnamon or cumin to taste.  Bake at 350 for 15 minutes until carrots are tender.

Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings 4
Print

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Ingredients:

2 Lbs Brussels sprouts (shaved in a food processor or quartered by hand)

4 Tablespoons ghee or grass fed butter

3 teaspoons sea salt

3 teaspoons ground turmeric

Spread the Brussels sprouts on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.  Dot with ghee/butter.  Sprinkle salt and turmeric over the sprouts.  Bake at 300 degrees for 30-45 minutes until tender (20-30 minutes at 350) until tender.

You can certainly half this recipe, but I always use 2 lbs to assure that I have plenty of my favorite vegetable for my breakfasts!  These are great with bacon or another breakfast meat!


Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings 6

 

I know, I KNOW...setting aside any time in the day is difficult. It's HARD.

But setting aside prayer time, time with GOD, is the most important time of your day and without it, the rest of the time just doesn't go the same, does it?

So how do you do it?

Well, for me, my best time is when the rest of the house is quiet.  And while that doesn't please my tired body at 6am when my alarm goes off, it does please my soul.   So that's what I do.  I set the alarm for 6 (or a time that I know I'll have at LEAST a half hour or more to wash my face, get that first 16 ounces of water in, maybe make a cup of coffee and start my morning devotion time in a QUIET, peaceful atmosphere).  I like to have more than that half hour, but sometimes my body is too tired.  Regardless, I like to have as much quiet time for my reading and prayer as possible.

I start out with some quiet prayer time.  I may say a few of our Orthodox morning prayers...

From my bed and sleep Thou hast raised me:  O Lord, enlighten my mind and my heart, and open my lips that I may praise thee, O Holy Trinity:  Holy, holy, holy art thou, O God.  Through the Theotokos have mercy on us.

but mostly this is quiet time for me to talking to God, thanking Him for my blessings, asking him to increase my faith and telling him what's on my mind.

I, personally, save most of my formal prayers for Morning Prayer time with my family (or, as it turns out most days, me with my youngest son).  I follow this up with my daily readings, and either studying the psalms (one that I'm working on memorizing and one or two extra), more Gospel reading or the book of Isaiah (which just happens to be the book I'm trying to work on currently, using a bible study guide to help me along and understand this prophetic book more clearly).  Sometimes I follow up with another book on the Orthodox Faith or a devotional or similar book.  Currently this is when I'm trying to read a minimum of five pages of Thirty Steps To Heaven- the book I chose to focus on for the season of Lent.

Your prayer time may look similar to mine or it may look completely different.  There is no hard and fast rule.  BUT ,  you should have a rule.  Something to guide yourself to be sure you always have that prayer time.

Now- keep in mind-  do allow for flexibility.  Your time of prayer rule shouldn't be dogma.  There are times it just won't be possible to keep it.  Times you may need to pray earlier, later. in a different place (my preferred place is my comfy living room chair) or dramatically shorten the time.  The important thing is that you do make your prayer time, your time with God, a regular routine.  It's too important to continuously skip.

While remembering to allow for flexibility, think about what time is best for you?  Morning? Afternoon?  Early evening? Bedtime?  Does it need to be a quiet time like mine?  Maybe distractions aren't an issue for you and you can be more flexible for it.  Maybe you have a ten minute break time at work where you can sneak off and have a few minutes.  Think on it. Ponder.  I'm sure you can come up with SOMETHING.

Short on time?  Even 5 minutes for now is better than nothing.

Of course, the more time you spend with Him, the more mindful and aware of His ever presence you will be.  But sometimes the course of our lives don't allow that half hour or more in a day.  What can you do then?  Well last Lent I was experiencing just this.  A dear friend of mine, my Godmother actually, mentioned again the prayer soap she had.  A special bar of soap she had that when she used it, she would pray for someone.  So I took away our liquid soaps for the duration of Lent and replaced them with bars of soap.  They weren't all fancy, but because it was a bar, it made me remember.  And so when I washed my hands, I would pray for something....maybe for my Godmother or another person, but mostly I just used the Jesus Prayer as I was washing.

Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me.

It was a good habit all through Lent, and while I admit I don't ALWAYS think to do so now (and have returned to my liquid soaps), I do quite often find myself praying the Jesus prayer at this time.  It was a great way to be sure I was getting in at least SOME prayer time in my day.  So if you are really truly pressed for time, some sort of thing like this may be just what you need to get started.

What do YOU do to get in your prayer time?  I'm sure others would love some more tips!

2

I've been all over the board when it comes to homeschooling.  Well, maybe not all over the board, but pretty close to it.

We started homeschooling  way back in , gosh, what year was that?  My daughter was in 5th grade when we pulled her out.  She's now a senior in college (doing really well, thank you!) Wow.  What an adventure it has been!  When we first took her out, we spent the remaining months of the school year (it was March) in a rather relaxed state.  Not as relaxed as I would have liked it to have been knowing what I know now about all the different styles of homeschooling, but relaxed for what I knew.  Her emotional and physical health were my priority.  They were definitely more important than academics so since math and science totally stressed her out, we didn't do much with it at all.  Oh, I got raised eyebrows on that one all right.  Especially from family members and others that just don't get the concept of homeschooling or that education does NOT have to look like what it does in public schools.  I have to admit I allowed it to unnerve me a bit and I really wish  I hadn't.  I wish I would have read more about Charlotte Mason and more about unschooling back then.  If I had, we would have dumped ALL academics the rest of that year and just focused on nature study and art study. Oh well, I can't change the past.  But I can learn from it and from the experiences of others.

The following year we added my son to our homeschool (he finished out 1st grade but wanted to be home with us) and it was more of a school at home setup.  We did okay, used Sonlight for most things and Abeka Math.  We enjoyed the Sonlight materials but threw out a lot of the fluff by the end of the year.  The rest of the years was me piecing together this and that- but still looking for 'curriculum' for most subjects-  other than science the year we still lived in York and the kids did Envirothon with the homeschool group there.  Oh , THAT was grand!  I think they still look back as one of their best homeschooling experiences.

Time went by and now I have my senior in college, a senior in high school (yes, still at home!) AND an almost 7 year old.

My schooling style with THIS young man is completely different.  It's even progressed during the last year.  I started out completely on board with the Charlotte Mason approach but quickly decided, that while I love her philosophy,  a mixture of her methods and unschooling methods may be more along our lines of educational philosophy at this time in our lives.  And it's definitely more in line with my son's needs and learning style.

I'm looking forward to sharing with you the things we are doing - the reading, the memory work, the nature walks, the timeline, the US map, Life of Fred, and, most importantly, the amount of FREE PLAY he is allowed.  Oh yes, and the JOY.  🙂

In the meantime, I have dinner to cook, a Lemongrass Spa event to plan, a 6 year old to read to, and lots of things to catch up on from the week before driving my oldest son off to his girlfriend's grandmother's home where he will be leaving for a trip to Florida to see his girlfriend.  So while you are waiting for the next Homeschool Update Segment,  WHAT KIND OF CHANGES HAVE YOU MADE ON YOUR HOMESCHOOL JOURNEY?